Alan's Vintage Watches 

Featured Watches
Hi. This is Alan. This page has links to many, many watches that I have featured with their own individual pages. This page began as a sort of "offshoot" of my original site called Alan's Vintage Watches, as a page called What's New? But, the What's New became a bit cluttered, and the links generally were not accompanied by pictures of the particular watch. 

I've essentially cloned the What's New? links to this page, but have cleaned up the formatting, and have included pictures of each featured watch by its link, so you can quick-scroll visually. I have listed them in no particular order. There is a wide variety of watches, from Rolex to K-mart, from military issue watches, to watches for kids learning to tell time, from Japanese-market Timex to watches for Russian doctors.

Each featured watch page will have several pictures of the watch, along with various descriptions and other text-based information. Some pages have their own internal links you can follow if interested. Click link or the picture below, to get to the page.

Many of these watches I still own, but many I have sold off, and in some cases have given away.

Feel free to contact me with any questions or comments about these watches, or about vintage watches in general. Click on this link, to get my email address. My Twitter is here.

I hope you will enjoy looking through the pages of these featured watches. Thank you for your interest.

 Alan. NEW: the page has become so large, it required a PAGE 2. (Link also at the very bottom.)
I recommend though that you start here at page 1
Russian watches. This page highlights a number of Russian-made mechanical watches, and includes documents and other information.
Timex Marlin reissue 2017. This is not a vintage watch, but it is a mechanical watch very faithfully recreating a classic Timex from 1965. It is the first mechanical watch Timex has made in decades.
Omega US Army watch. 1944-1945. Weird eccentric dial, center seconds hand.
Rolex Submariner, ref. 5513, from 1969. Domed crystal, no date meters before feet dial.
Russian ZARIA watch for kids. The football moves back and forth with the seconds. Really small and cute watch. '60s or '70s.
Seiko 5, automatic. From 1976. (This pic was when dial removed for a case swap project.)
Mechanical clock removed from a Russian MiG fighter jet. This pic is just a very small part of dial. Works very well. I had it mounted on a plastic stand.
Kelton "kitchen clock" : 1950s, Electric. 'Harmony of design is keynote to an attractive kitchen.' 
K-mart Vintage Mechnical Watch!  DE-LUXE! "If it wasn't for the iconic slanted K on the dial, there would be nothing special about this K-time." 
Page on mechanical digital watches, sometimes called "direct read," or "jump hour" watches. I love these for what they are, but never liked telling time with them. Read on.
Timex automatic watch, for Arabic-speaking market, probably 1980s. 
This is not a wristwatch, but it a wrist device. It's I believe a "planimeter," a device for mapping. 
Timex "Southampton," 1950s. Kind of a "fake chronograph," more like a start-start timer.
Sputnik watch, late 1950s or early 1960s. Russian watch. Big page on the watch, and on Sputnik.
1950s Timex with Sea Scouts emblem. Striking black dial and green luminous material.
My own attempts to paint a watch dial after removing the existing dial design. (It went ok, for amateur.)
Timex Electric. (Link under construction). Early 1960s. The setting crown is on the back. Mechanical watch, run by battery.
R-X-W Zeromaster RXW. Formerly "Prolex," until Rolex sued them, haha. It was created by Takeshi Sato of Ken Trading in Japan. This is an homage to the rare 1930s Rolex Zerograph. It is a truly amazing watch. Click the link and make sure to scroll to bottom of page to see comments from the creator.
Timex "Bullseye" Sprite, 1971-1973. Sometimes called Target or Roulette, this is an iconic and highly sought old Timex. Tremendous amount of information, pics, catalog details and more at this link.
Rolex Explorer, ref. 1016. Classic watch from either 1967 or 1969, I cannot remember. One of my favorite watches of all the ones I'ver ever had.
Timex Playskook kids watch, 1987. Haha, now they would call it a "Timex x Playskool collaboration," and people would be lining up in sleeping bags outside the Timex store for the limited edition of 500. Maybe not. But I love this watch, and I have worn it unironically.
Seiko SUS Military Style Automatic - 4S15. This watch, from 1995 or 1996. The legend goes it was "conceived to introduce to a new generation of Japanese youth, what was for them a novel concept: the analog watch." I believe the legend. It is an amazing watch, and highly sought.
Russian medical watch, by Slava. This is a fun, almost crazy looking watch. 1989 : pre-Wall Soviet relic. Scales for timing heart beat, etc. I've got the paperwork for this and it looks like bureaucracy.
Timex "TV dial" watch, probably 1970s. Seems very rare; I've only seen just this one. Cannot find any information on it. Appears to have been made at the Timex factory in Dundee, Scotland. No one I have asked has ever seen or heard of this watch.
General Electric x-ray darkroom timer. March 1954. Very loud alarm.
Smiths W10 Army Watch, 1967. Broad arrow, all that stuff. Maybe the last of the all-England watches. Sold this to a chiropractor in Los Angeles, some years back.
Timex nurse's watch. 1950s. Very clinical looking. Hangs upside down, pinned to nurse's uniform.
1950s Timex Marlin. "Made in Great Britain." Nice red-tipped arrow seconds hand. Good dial.
Timex Color Flicks, 1970s. Sometimes called Color Flix. Dial has three painted color sections, and the seconds hand is replaced by a translucent disc with three color sections. As the disc turns, the overlapping additive color effects are visible.
Hilton mystery dial watch.  I hated this watch, and was so glad to have sold it off.
1971 "Black & Blue" Timex, from England. Appears to be exceedingly rare. Pic taken when movement was taken out for a case swap procedure. Dial is intense.
Timex "Mod" Watch, by Todd Snyder x Timex. Recreation of the iconic early 1970s Timex "bullseye" Sprite, in a much larger, robust watch with a steel case, quartz movement. A really fine watch.
Timex Marlin, probably 1954 or 1955. This is the classic watch, that was on the cover of the Timex history book by McDermott. The watch was also re-created as quartz in the early 2000s, and sold exclusively though the US store Target. It was pretty decent. Here is that recreation.
Two strange bracelets with embedded fake leather bits. Combined with warmth of fake leather, with the strength of stretchy steel. It may have even been rich Corinthian leather.
Page on Ingersoll watches, including this Ingersoll Nurse's watch. 1940s, I am guessing. Pretty nice watch, larger than the Timex nurse watch listed above. Hangs by a pin from nurse's uniform. Notice this one is not upside down, like the Timex.
Ben Hogan Timex, 1950s. Ben Hogan was a golfer. Sold this to a gentleman in New York, some years back. It is basically a 1950s Timex Marlin, signed by Hogan.
Wittnauer automatic, 1975. Brushed steel case. The shape of the dial can probably be called "TV shaped." The dial color is like pink champagne on ice. We are all just prisoners of our own device.
Timex Marlin, UK made, 1950s, in gold. I'm not into gold anything, really, but somehow I made an exception for this watch.
Seiko Field Master Watch, 1980s. Two-headed watch. It is a watch, along with a compass, alarm timer, and map meter. Some people say it was used by covert military operators in Central America. I'm not sure I believe that. It is a very strange piece. Was quite uncomfortable to wear.
Dive watches. About a dozen diver watches listed at this page, with pictures. None of these are serious watches a diver would wear, but show the extent to which watch manufacturers wanted to capture the appeal of these types of watches.
Electron micrograph photos of vintage watch movements, dials and hands. Scanning electron microscope photos of old watches. Nine images of two different watches.
Radium watch dial image patterns by x-ray exposure. Autoradiograph of a 1945 Omega wristwatch. Radioactive watch explored by interesting experiments.
Timex x Todd Snyder Mod Watch, in black. Usually this watch is in a stainless steel case, but I decided to try putting in into a black PVD case. Here are the pictures and procedure.
Timex MIL-W-46374B 1982. The only known Timex made to a military specification. Made to be disposable. Had tritium hands and dial, thus the radioactive symbol. An exceedingly rare Timex. Much has been written about it.
J Crew Timex 2008. Military style watch, quartz movement. Maybe the first design "collaboration" between Timex and a major clothing retailer or designer. 
Engineered Garments × TIMEX x Beams Boy / bespoke 別注 SST Camper. Steel case watch with mineral crystal. Check out the dial! Product exclusive to Japan market. January, 2018.
Timex x Nigel Cabourn Military Style Watch. 【SS18 UNISEX】 Nigel Cabourn x TIMEX - ナムウォッチ / NAM WATCH. With steel Camper case, crown and mineral crystal identical to the reverse-dial Timex listed immediately above, this is the first collaboration between Timex and designer Cabourn. March 2018.
TIMEX x Engineered Garments x Beams Boy / bespoke 別注 black, resin-case Camper watch, Japanese Timex. Similar to the above steelcase "mirror image" dial Japan Timex watch, this one is in black plastic case. March, 2018. 
*** THERE IS MORE! Click here to get to PAGE 2 of "Featured Watches." ***

Contact me.

Alan's Vintage Watches page.



1980s small mechanical TIMEX. This a small watch in a white plastic single-piece solid lug case very similar in proportion and design to the TIMEX Camper watches.
TIMEX x Todd Snyder collaboration, reissue of a 1950s TIMEX Marlin. Japan-only Todd Snyder collaboration, 37 mm. From March 2016.
"SOVIET TROOPS of RADIATION CHEMICAL PROTECTION USSR RUSSIAN MILITARY WATCH 70s!"  Haha. This huge watch is amazing. Old pocket watch converted to a wristwatch. I believe the dial design to be completely made up, nothing to do with any 1970s radiation troops watch. That's my opinion. If anyone has facts to support this being what it claims otherwise to be, please let me know. But I love this huge watch for what it is.
Todd Snyder x TIMEX "Military Watch." A re-issue of a 1977 military-style automatic TIMEX. 
1994 mechanical TIMEX "ACQUA" brand, in a "Camper" style. Black resin / plastic case. Also: someone tried to pry off a nonexistent case-back.